Friday, December 14, 2007

The Philippine Eagle, Some Good News


Even as a child in the Philippines in the 1960s, I was aware of this great bird of prey that was the subject of reports by the National Geographic Society and Life magazine. The aviator Charles Linbergh came to the Philippines and helped focus the world's attention on this eagle and what has been its constant nemesis--- extinction. Through the dedicated work of conservationists and their backers, the future of the Philippine Eagle ( Pithecophaga jefferyi) is no longer as grim as before.

The Agence France-Presse recently reported on the 22nd Philippine Eagle born and bred in captivity. It is in good health and fed a nourishing meal of ground quail meat. It is still without a name. Evidently, the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF), organized in 1987 and situated in Davao, allows individuals or companies to name the chicks if they donate at a certain level. It's all for a great cause, obviously. The center estimated that only 600 of these eagles are left.

The Philippine Eagle is considered one of the three largest eagles in the world. When fully grown, the eagle's wing span can measure up to an awe-inspiring 6.6 feet. Another remarkable aspect of the Philippine Eagle is its longevity. The PEF reported that the Rome zoo took in a fully grown eagle in 1934, and that eagle lived till 1976. Another example comes from the Philippine Eagle Center itself where a young eaglet arrived in 1969 and it is still alive today.

If you want to learn more about the conservation efforts involving the eagle, please click on the link I provided above for the Philippine Eagle Foundation. Here is also some further reading:

http://www.nwf.org/nationalwildlife/article.cfm?issueID=104&articleID=1318

Photo credit: Philippine Eagle Foundation

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

i really hope the people who take care of these precious treasures are "different" and can make a difference. this beautiful animal is one of the few cultural icons my country has left. if they go extinct, the memory of my country and what it used to be might die with it.

but the fact that there's some good news brightens my day. i hope and pray with all of my being that the Philippine Eagle (Haribon) will continue to live without fear and soar in our skies, inspiring the people who share its land.