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U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand. Goose-Killing Roundup Proposed. Animal Holocaust.



I am crossposting a message from our dear friends at Keep Life in the Park.


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Dear Friends of NJ Wildlife,
 
As we enter the warmer months with goslings appearing shortly, the following articles are relevant to us New Jersey too.  Intelligence and compassion can help us co-exist with the creatures that also call our outdoor space home.  The bird that survived the arrow is proof of how low some humans can stoop.  We take the high road promote non-violence towards all animals.
 
K.L.I.P.
 
 
 
Oppose Senator Gillibrand's Goose-Killing NYC Wildlife Refuge

Birds striking planes up five-fold since 1990;

Sullenberger calls experience key

Captain Chesley Sullenberger, who landed his US Airways flight on the Hudson River after birds were sucked into both engines in 2009, interviewed with CBS Evening News anchor Scott Pelley, and revealed alarming news that New York City plans to build garbage facilities next to city airports, a dangerous move that will guarantee birds being attracted to those areas.

Pelley: Sully, why has the number of bird strikes increased so dramatically?
Sullenberger: Scott, the bird populations have increased and we’re flying more flights now that we’ve ever had before.
Pelley: What could airports do about this?
Sullenberger: Effective land-use planning around local airports is the best to prevent birds from roosting near the airport. It’s important that we not build anywhere near an airport anything likely to attract birds, especially trash facilities.
Pelley: You don’t want to build a garbage dump next to an airport, for example?
Sullenberger: Exactly. In fact, in New York City right now there are plans to do just that, and it’s a terrible idea to build something that is likely to attract birds.
After birds strike 2 planes, senator proposes allowing goose kills at NY wildlife refuge
By Associated Press, Updated: Thursday, April 26, 3:11 AM
NEW YORK — The problem of birds living near some of the nation’s busiest airports is coming under renewed scrutiny after two emergency landings in a week and more than three years after the famous ditching of a jetliner in the Hudson River .
U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand on Wednesday proposed making it easier to round up geese from a federal refuge near Kennedy Airport and kill them, an idea that’s meeting opposition from wildlife advocates.
A JetBlue plane bound for West Palm Beach , Fla. , made an emergency landing at Westchester County Airport north of New York City on Tuesday. A Los Angeles-bound jet made an emergency landing at Kennedy Airport after a bird strike on the right engine a week ago.

No one was hurt, but Grant Cardone, a sales training consultant who was on the flight out of Kennedy and was filming video from his window in seat 1D as the birds hit the plane, said it was scary.
“I felt like the plane was going to roll over on its right side,” Cardone said. “Those five or six seconds were terrifying.”
Cardone, 54, said he texted his wife that the flight was in trouble and added, “I love you and I love the kids.” Afterward, the pilot managed to stabilize the plane and land.
Gillibrand’s bill would empower the U.S. Department of Agriculture to remove Canada geese from the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge during June and July when they are molting and can’t fly.
“We cannot and should not wait another day to act while public safety is at risk,” the New York Democrat said in a statement.
But the idea of a goose roundup at a wildlife refuge that is part of the National Park Service has its detractors.
“It’s the only bird refuge that we have in New York City ,” said Edita Birnkrant , New York director of Friends of Animals. “If they can’t be protected in a wildlife refuge, then where can they be protected?
Friends of Animals 777 Post Road Darien CT 06820 203-656-1522

Goose survives arrow being shot through its head

 
 
OLD LYME, Conn. — Animal control officers are keeping tabs on a goose who has been wandering around with an arrow through its head.
The Day of New London has posted video of the bird, which was first spotted near Rogers Lake in February.
Old Lyme assistant animal control officer Lizabeth Gode tells the newspaper they have been using food and nets in an attempt to capture the bird. But she says that because it can still fly, those attempts have been unsuccessful.
“We’re keeping an eye out,” Gode told the newspaper. “If the arrow gets stuck on something or he gets sick, we can grab him . . . but he’s doing great.”
She said once the bird is captured a veterinarian will be called in to determine whether the arrow can be removed.

 
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