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Nellie. Pit Bull. Home At Last. Her Day has Come.

Some excellent news! Nellie, a young female pittie, finally went home after one year and three months at the shelter--- that's fifteen months, or approximately 455 days of shelter life. Think back, even for a year, in your life. Imagine, if you can, every hour of that time. Nellie spent all that time a homeless, family- less dog, living in a hard and uncomfortable kennel, waiting for someone to make her a member of their family. In the course of that time, Nellie developed some health problems and she was taken to the vet several times. She received a strict diet to address her problem. Even her cookies were specially tailored to her condition. Frankly, there were hints at euthanasia but the volunteers collectively staved off that idea. Perhaps, the byproduct of her being a longstanding resident of the shelter is the special status, a special consideration for a loving dog whose only shortcoming was not even her fault. Two adopters considered her, but no cigar. Her escape from a life of virtual solitude vanished as quickly as it came. Nellie was akin to that proverbial dry twig at the edge of the bonfire. Just waiting for her turn but somehow always overlooked. The situation looked bleak, but there was always hope. Nellie was a flickering light that the darkness could not overcome.

Have a great life, sweetie. No matter how much we love you, we don't want to see you again at the shelter! It was nice to see your kennel empty. Mwah.


Comments

How wonderful she got a happy ending! I always recall a line in the Coldplay song, Clocks, "Home, home where I wanted to go," when I think of these homeless pets.

And how wonderful that there are shelter volunteers like yourself to take care of these animals.
Chessbuff said…
Thanks, Catherine. Please say a prayer for Nellie. It's been a long journey for her.

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